From the book Creative Grab Bag: Inspiring Challenges for Designers, Illustrators and Artists by Ethan Bodnar.

Want to join in? Email marvinartists@tumblr.com
  • folioninja
  • thobgood
  • acamedie
  • colettehenderson
  • controlz
  • eitanlees
  • goldenagebakery
  • jscronce
  • mfhumanfax
  • shoetrumpet
thobgood:

Gettin’ paid to draw at work. This rocks.

thobgood:

Gettin’ paid to draw at work. This rocks.

robertbapst:

I am Lazer Beam Squad.
This is my new hit single.
Badasses With Plasma Torches: http://soundcloud.com/lazerbeamsquad/badasses-with-plasma-torches

I humbly submit this to the collective for your consideration.

Picture from my pool pass when I was four years old. My mom says I was too shy to have my picture taken, and the only way I’d agree to it is if I could hold my favourite toy, a fire truck.
-Ted

Picture from my pool pass when I was four years old. My mom says I was too shy to have my picture taken, and the only way I’d agree to it is if I could hold my favourite toy, a fire truck.

-Ted

CHALLENGE: Come As You Were

CHALLENGE: Come As You Were

One of my favourite book series from elementary school.
-Ted

One of my favourite book series from elementary school.

-Ted

TITLE: Gateway Thug
Kit

TITLE: Gateway Thug

Kit

Hey there Marvinites. Another week, another exciting artistic Challenge!
Penguin Books, the UK publisher, is famous for their distinctive cover designs. The design style has gone through many different phases, with the iconic orange covers being arguably the most famous. (The covers were coded by colour, sharing a common design layout. Orange was for general fiction, green was crime, cerise for travel and adventure, and so on.) Illustrated covers were resisted for many years, but when they did arrive, the images were distinctive and bold. Icons and text were also used in a bold style that made Penguin Books stand out from other titles at your local W.H. Smith’s. Penguin also published Pelican books (intended to be educational) and Puffin Books (aimed at children).
For examples of Penguin Book covers, a simple Google search will turn up zillions of matches. Good centralized collections are this one of science fiction titles, this great two-page Flickr collection, and this large gallery from a book cover-related site. Need the Penguin logo? You can find a nice large one here. The older Penguin badge is in this image (which may also serve as a template if you want to do one of the more basic, classic cover styles). And the excellent Wikipedia article from which I got much of the information in this post tells us that the common font used on the early Penguin Books was Gill Sans.
So what we’re doing is picking a book that has not been released by Penguin (don’t feel the need to prove it hasn’t been, though! Save your energy for being creative!) and then making a new cover design in the Penguin style. Do one in the banded colour format of the early days, something bold and dynamic like the books of the 60s and 70s, or the classy artsy covers of the 21st century. Be imaginative; be clever; be a Marvin Artist!
-Ted
PS: pretty much unrelated, but this poster advertising Penguin’s new audiobook range is AWESOME.
PPS: Another aside: this is possibly my favourite Penguin cover EVER.

Hey there Marvinites. Another week, another exciting artistic Challenge!

Penguin Books, the UK publisher, is famous for their distinctive cover designs. The design style has gone through many different phases, with the iconic orange covers being arguably the most famous. (The covers were coded by colour, sharing a common design layout. Orange was for general fiction, green was crime, cerise for travel and adventure, and so on.) Illustrated covers were resisted for many years, but when they did arrive, the images were distinctive and bold. Icons and text were also used in a bold style that made Penguin Books stand out from other titles at your local W.H. Smith’s. Penguin also published Pelican books (intended to be educational) and Puffin Books (aimed at children).

For examples of Penguin Book covers, a simple Google search will turn up zillions of matches. Good centralized collections are this one of science fiction titles, this great two-page Flickr collection, and this large gallery from a book cover-related site. Need the Penguin logo? You can find a nice large one here. The older Penguin badge is in this image (which may also serve as a template if you want to do one of the more basic, classic cover styles). And the excellent Wikipedia article from which I got much of the information in this post tells us that the common font used on the early Penguin Books was Gill Sans.

So what we’re doing is picking a book that has not been released by Penguin (don’t feel the need to prove it hasn’t been, though! Save your energy for being creative!) and then making a new cover design in the Penguin style. Do one in the banded colour format of the early days, something bold and dynamic like the books of the 60s and 70s, or the classy artsy covers of the 21st century. Be imaginative; be clever; be a Marvin Artist!

-Ted

PS: pretty much unrelated, but this poster advertising Penguin’s new audiobook range is AWESOME.

PPS: Another aside: this is possibly my favourite Penguin cover EVER.

CHALLENGE: Mr Popper, Eat Your Heart Out

CHALLENGE: Mr Popper, Eat Your Heart Out

I haven’t quite got the outfits done yet, so I figured I’d post my doll solo, as “proof of concept”. It’s okay to be Takei.
Done in Manga Studio Debut. (I promise to have my outfits up soon, so you can all dress George as fabulously as you’d like!)
-Ted
PS: the arms are semi-traced from one of the Kyle Hilton originals, as is the outline of the torso. Muscles, legs, and head are all me. (Still trying to learn the basics of drawing, so my anatomy proportions are a bit odd. It’s okay to be novice.)

I haven’t quite got the outfits done yet, so I figured I’d post my doll solo, as “proof of concept”. It’s okay to be Takei.

Done in Manga Studio Debut. (I promise to have my outfits up soon, so you can all dress George as fabulously as you’d like!)

-Ted

PS: the arms are semi-traced from one of the Kyle Hilton originals, as is the outline of the torso. Muscles, legs, and head are all me. (Still trying to learn the basics of drawing, so my anatomy proportions are a bit odd. It’s okay to be novice.)